Egyptian media raided the day after his journalist’s arrest

Egyptian media raided the day after his journalist’s arrest

Last week, Mada Masr published an article claiming that President Abdel Fattah al-Sissi’s son, Mahmoud, had been transferred to Moscow to take up a diplomatic post.

The Egyptian independent media Mada Masr announced on Sunday that it will be searched on its premises in Cairo, the day after the arrest of one of its journalists.

“Plain-clothes police raided Mada Masr’s offices in Cairo. Staff are currently being held up, and their phones have been cut off,” wrote the independent online newspaper on its Twitter account.

The police intervention took place the day after the arrest of Shady Zalat, 37 years old, at his home.

Mada Masr is known for her investigations on corruption and security issues, published in Arabic and English.

Last week, Mada Masr published an article claiming that President Abdel Fattah al-Sissi’s son, Mahmoud, had been transferred to Moscow to take up a diplomatic post.

Its reassignment would take place after internal criticism within the security apparatus, according to the article.

It was not clear whether Shady Zalat, who has been working for Mada Masr since 2014, participated in this survey.

 

Wave of repression

A journalist from Mada Masr speaking from outside the offices confirmed to AFP at midday that the police were still in the premises, around which he said he had seen several security forces vehicles.

 

“They first stopped me from entering, then took me to the 6th floor, where the office is located. We knocked on the door and I saw my colleagues for a split second,” he said.

 

“A policeman, also in plain clothes, said’no one goes in or out’ and they let me go,” he added, adding that he would return with a lawyer.

Since Mr. Sissi came to power in 2014, a wave of repression has broken out against Egyptian journalists, opponents and activists.

Mada Masr is one of the 100 information sites blocked by the Egyptian authorities in recent years, and accessible only via a VPN application for Egyptians.

Egypt is the country that jails the most journalists in the world after China and Turkey, according to the Committee to Protect Journalists, an association based in New York.

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